Saturday, November 25, 2017

There Is No Alternative


Now, the short answer to Michael Crick's question here is "No it isn't" with the follow-up of "How in the name of God did you get a job explaining politics to the public?" 

The longer answer is that getting the Conservative Party out of government is priority number one for addressing most of the country's serious problems.  The Tories can't solve our multiple current crises because the Tories are the crisis. 

Consider just Brexit alone.  The striking thing about our national response to Brexit has been the bizarre lengths we've gone to for a reason why Brexit isn't the Tories' fault, variously blaming Labour's immigration policies, the snootiness of urban librulz and a conspiracy of Russian tweets, to name just a few.

None of these excuses ring true, because they aren't true.  Brexit didn't just fall on Britain out of a clear blue sky.  It was willed into existence by generations of Conservative politicians, driven by their donors and applauded to the rafters by their creatures in the press.

Public resentment of the EU was the creation of decades of hard work by Conservative politicians, including the current Foreign Secretary.  The wave of idiotic spite that created a 52% vote in favour of leaving the EU is the product of years and years of made up and half-true tabloid dreck - mostly for profit, but in no small measure because newspaper owners instructed their employees to boost the Conservatives' electoral prospects.

The decision to hold a referendum in the first place wasn't forced on the Tories, but was consciously chosen by David Cameron in a successful strategy to win back the party's plummeting popularity with racist pensioners.

Despite what you might have heard, it was the Tories that led the Remain campaign with such stellar levels of competence and credibility.  The Brexit negotiations with the EU haven't been catastrophic because of some innate diplomatic difficulty, but because Theresa May's Tories decided to turn Brexit negotiations into a vote-winning campaign pitting older rural voters against younger, urban ones - "Somewheres" against "Anywheres".

Ultimately, the reason there's such an air of unreality around Brexit as an issue is because so many people can't admit to this one simple truth - that the Tories can't ever solve this problem because the Tories themselves are the problem. 

And that's just one issue, rather than the full range of immediate problems that need to be addressed.  From our ludicrous housing market to tottering public services and the sharp differences in the interests of the young and the old - these are in large part the handiwork of the Conservative Party and more importantly, they're absolutely essential to the Tories' future electoral prospects.

The Tories can't and won't do anything to tackle any of these problems because they're not problems, as far as the Tories are concerned - they're a pre-requisite for their continued success.

Which is a long way of saying that it doesn't matter how loudly Anna Soubry condemns Brexit while she votes with the government, nor does it matter that certain journalists are too dim to realise that she's part of the problem, not the solution.

If we want to even begin to tackle the nation's problems, the Tories have to go - all of them out of Parliament, even the less openly carnivorous ones, preferably forever.  There is no alternative.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Do you remember those comment pieces from last year, which said that moderate Tory MPs would stop Brexit or said that their opposition would ensure that Brexit was well-planned?

All that has been strangely forgotten.

Moderate Tory MPs are the dog that didn't bark.



Guano

organic cheeseboard said...

The striking thing about our national response to Brexit has been the bizarre lengths we've gone to for a reason why Brexit isn't the Tories' fault, variously blaming Labour's immigration policies, the snootiness of urban librulz and a conspiracy of Russian tweets, to name just a few.

You've missed an even bigger 'blame', resurrected AGAIN by Marina Hyde today but also endorsed by the Shipman book 'All Out War' - that Corbyn didn't campaign hard enough for Brexit because either he's inept, or couldn't be bothered, or actually wanted a Leave vote, etc. A lot of my (fairly intelligent) friends have read the Shipman book and are completely convinced that it's all Corbyn's fault. I looked through the book and the incredibly partisan account of the Remain campaign therein makes it seem pretty clear that Shipman either didn't manage to find anyone sympathetic to Corbz to interview, or, more likely, he didn't bother and just interviewed Will Straw.

What I don't understand is that to believe in this kind of narrative you have to have always thought (or, have forgotten that you used to to think) that Corbyn was a strong and effective leader who enjoyed the full support of his MPs - you also have to have forgotten what happened when Labour teamed up with the tories in the Scottish Independence referendum.

I still find it baffling that the media (and the City) haven't dropped the Tories like a stone since Brexit. All that guff about dangerous Ed Miliband that they were willing to fully endorse, and look what happens when the safe pair of hands Tories are let fully loose on the country for the first time in 20 years. But still, Venezuela!

Anonymous said...

Your thread of 17th January 2018, in reaction to Danny Finkelstein, is very good.



Guano